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Jamestown soldier killed in World War One Identified almost 100 years on

digger.jpgA World War One soldier from Jamestown, killed in France, after almost 100 years has been identified.
The man, found to be Corporal Edward Clarence Inglis, was killed in May of 1918 when his battalion, mainly from SA and Western Australia, attacked Monument Wood in Northern France.
His grave has been left unidentified since, but a new investigation has found that he is indeed the soldier that occupies that grave.
Premier Jay Weatherill officially unveiled the headstone for Corporal Inglis at Adelaide cemetary, recently.
In a statement, Mr Weatherill says It may be nearly a century after his death, but it’s important a South Australian hero is properly honoured.

Corporal Edward Clarence Inglis, service number 2352 was part of the 48th Australian Infantry Battalion, in operation between 1914 and 1918.

His date of death was 03 May 1918, at , Villers-Bretonneux, Picardie, France. 

Edward Clarence Inglis's name is located at panel 146 in the Commemorative Area at the Australian War Memorial. 

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